comments 23

Basic Impetvs Wargaming Transformation

It’s finally happened! I’m getting organised and I’ve finally hit upon a system. The rules system is the newly released Basic Impetvs 2.0 . Is a gem of a publication, fourteen pages of medium complexity rules and hundreds of armylists. The armylists are my salvation. Could I ever resist the next lot of must have minis? No, the result after nearly forty years of collecting is a back room crammed with minis and very few complete armies. This is going to change!


The armies are on the big-base format. The rules writer does insist that the depth is largely irrelevant, as is the number of figures. The older DBX bases are fine and I won’t need to rebase everything. The ultimate aim is to get one collection “complete”  in one box; ready for a game, no need to proxy or hunt through other storage trays. My downfall has been what might be called “mission creep” i.e. I start with one army and just keep adding. You must help me with my addiction. The only time I will use the same figures will be when the armies could not due to chronology or geography have ever fought. So I will use Huns against the Empire and the same figures , plus some elephants, as Hephthalites- those cranium mounded cousins charging through India.


A Basic Impetvs army has between eight and twelve units. With each army there are various core units and then the chance to take extra or upgraded troops. Option three is generally to alter the initiative dice in the game. General’s are incorporated into one of the units but mine will be separate- too good a modelling opportunity to miss. Above is my Bactian Greek general wearing his cap that is still favoured by the locals in Afghan/ Norther Pakistan/ HesbackisStan.


There is a double army game so above is the leader of the remnant phalanx. Also to be found in Afghan are the blue eyed children of these ancient conquerors: unfortunately now shunned by the locals as being bad juijui!


The phalanx itself is sadly depleted so I’ve ordered some more fromWargames Foundry. The above were Aventine but I could not face glueing anymore heads on this side of Christmas. Similarly, the Bactrian light horse archers below are without many of the manufacturer’s add-ons. A few trips in the car and some heavy handed gamers would soon denude these steppe horsemen so why bother?


Keen list watchers will no doubt know that a Bactrian army can only have two units but the third may come out to play in a To the Strongest or Kings of War clash. Anyway, the Arachosians will be from First Corps- so much less glueing and pinning required. The Iranian lancers presented a bit of a quandary because they were pre- cataphract but some wore heavy armour against horse archery. They also dressed like earlier Companions but were bare headed. I opted for Foundry Companions in Boitian helmets. The Bactrians wore these helmets but generally without the cheek guards so no inspecting the photos when they are done!


How the hell did Cretans end up in Bactria I fear you ask? Well they did! Their rock throwing comrades are now in the Late Roman collection so they’ll have to say their goodbyes!


So that just leaves peltasts for the Bactrians to be complete and here an old present from Bodley Scott came in nicely. Maybe a little too uniform but they are lovely Foundry miniatures so they are in.


True to my word then, that’s one army planned and organised; with not too much left to paint. Next list is Indo-Greek, one of the satraps left behind on the borders. I’d bought Aventine Hellenistic archers so my Indian archers are distinctly Indo-Greek!


My Classic Indians are a little too numerous and were due to be sold. Two bases make one unit so there are some spare. Mountain Indians make an appearance in the second list so mine are a little lacking in warm clothing and beards.


Only twenty or so miniatures from First Corps and the second list will be done. I made a right mess of the Aventine elephants I had so it will be First Corps for them too. Before even the eBay photos were taken, the book fell open to the Hephthalites: three units of Indian levy needed. A different box but no man gets left behind! It’s been a really positive experience reorganising my collection. I’ve done a similar job on my 15mm Indians but then my eyes fell upon some painted Aventine Huns………Please make it stop!


Have a great weekend!

Michael

23 Comments

    • Thanks Bruce- it’s amazing how this hobby uncovers such hidden histories. I only discovered yesterday that the Persian empire was all over Northern India! So much more to research….

      Liked by 2 people

      • It is an old book now but, Armies and Enemies of the Macedonian and Punic wars by Phil Barker from Wargames Research Group (I have had my copy since 1976) is a good introduction to this period, organisation tactics and the various type of troops involved are all described and well worth a read. Another good book is Alexander the Greats Campaigns again by Phil Barker I have the1981 edition, this book is a good guide to Ancient political and military wargaming and covers from Phillip through to the campaigns in India, I would highly recommend it. I love this period in history and with two companies now producing plastic Persians it is becoming better served. The next SAGA universe will cover the Age of Alexander and I am having fun trying to pre-guess the forces included and the balance they will suggest. The new book is a must on my list of acquisitions next year.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Jonathan Freitag

    You have a fine collection. I am a big fan of BI2.0, and Impetvs 2.0. The handy thing about the basing for BI/Impetvs is that it works equally well for To the Strongest. BI2.0 is not new. I bought mine in 2016!

    Liked by 3 people

    • The look of Impetvs wins hands down for me! Was it full fat Impetvs that was a newer release? I was so impressed by the To the Strongest players who came to our Godendag competition. We also play Kings of War historical and Commands and Colors so system of Basing has to cope. We should hopefully try and set up some BI comps after Covid.
      Best
      Mike

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lists are great though. Larger than the diminutive D.B.A. and not too big that the rafters creak! We can still play Kings of War and even big battle DBA!
      What you been painting this weekend? Do you think we might get a game in over Christmas???

      Liked by 2 people

      • Steve Tim Jim

        Mostly painting Conquest, Last Argument of Kings fantasy minis at the mo 😁
        Would love a game πŸ‘

        Liked by 2 people

      • All sounds great- can’t wait to see them! Have you come across Warplaque? You’ll love them!
        Are we going back into lockdown Friday once again😷😳😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😒😒😒😒😒😒😒😒😒😒😒

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice Mike, I always appreciate (as you know) when one discovers a period of history that you did not know as much about before. And these are very impressive paint jobs. Keep it going!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I don’t know what version it is but I have the 2008 edition of the rules and my armies that are available for this are Minifigs 25mm (Republican Rome and Late Roman). Mind you they should have been retired or sold years ago, on the completion of 25 years service. I may get round to fielding them again but currently, they are based for the 4th edition Wargames Research Group rules.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. You asked about Pikes with Greek and Macedonian forces Mike, they are already covered in The Age of Hannibal, here they are the Sarissa and confer 2 benefits and a restriction, Move distance becomes S(more difficult to handle than a spear and needs greater control) but charge distance remains at M, If the unit has no Fatigue points it gets a+1 to its attack dice and once per turn after a move activation it gets a free shoot activation with a range of S (this is a special and a Sarissa armed unit can never be activated to shoot as it does not count as a ranged weapon, I think this simulates the greater reach provided by the weapon when close to an enemy. I don’t anticipate any changes to this with the Age of Alexander.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s