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He who fights and runs away……

imageWhich wargamer could resist the allure of the Tales of Robin Hood and his Merrie Men? Swash-buckling adventure in a time when it wasn’t frowned upon for men to wear tights. What started out as a run of the mill introduction to another set of rules got me planning a whole campaign with the innovative and exciting “Lions Rampant” from Osprey publishing. What follows is an account of our first game but I’m hopeful that it won’t be our last.

Hurrah for Merrie Englande!image

Ross the professional figure painter of Rossfigurepainting☺️, set up the scenario and provided the figures. The rules are easy to pick up and we were playing within minutes. Lions Rampant has quite a retro feel but it is perfectly suited to Hollywood style adventures. Each unit is between six and twelve figures and what is more, doesn’t require special dice or faction tables.

We were embarking on the Convoy scenario found in the rulebook. Roger’s evil Normans had to escort three VIPs, Saracen  emissaries to the duplicitous King John no doubt. Our freedom fighters had to stop the convoy and “convince” the Easterners to give us our rightful King back. Roger’s escort comprised two units of mounted men-at-arms, two units of foot yeomen, one unit of twelve crossbowmen and a six man unit of bidowers. For more information on the role of bidowers see the excellent Arcane Models blog.

Overconfident John's lackeys!

Overconfident John’s lackeys!

As we were early in the career of Robin, we assembled a wider variety of figures than the lists, also in the book, stipulate. The forces comprised two units of hard fighting yeomen ( a mix of forest revolutionaries and the tenants of Robin’s father ( who is on Crusade with King Richard of course), one unit of archers, one of crossbows( again from Earl Locksley’s estate) and six bidowers with javelin. Ross ‘ ‘javelins have to be seen to be believed! I do hope he ‘so not overcompensating for some shortfall elsewhere?

image

Coming from Canton in Cardiff, my partner Chris was of course well grounded in guerrilla warfare. Our deployment was based on using the Earl’s household troops to spring an initial ambush from the Southern forest. I would wait with Robin in the marshes to the South West that Roger would have to pass on his way off the table. To the North were the Earl’s mounted men at arms and our forester bidowers.

Read how the action played out in our special bank-holiday episode of Robin Hood and the convoy!

Read how the action played out in our special bank-holiday episode of Robin Hood and the convoy!

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About the Author

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The wild ramblings of an infamous wit and wargames guru. One of nature's true gentlemen who devotes his time to the care of his two sons, i.e. watching episodes of Peppa Pig together, and recreating great moments of military history using toy soldiers. Currently a leading light in The Collectivo Despertaferres wargames and duelling association who meet regularly at Firestorm Games ( formerly Ali Baba's Carpet Warehouse). Find me also on Facebook "Despertaferres"!

2 Comments

  1. Very envious of your Robin Hood game. I have played Lion Rampant just the once with my friends out here in the East and it was an instant favourite; especially with me, and you will know the reason why!
    I love the way the mechanics make the game adaptable to just about any period, and as I’m busy painting Huns at the moment, I am looking forward to getting some Romans together to try out.
    This is a good blog spot for said Late Romans v Various Enemies using LR…

    http://ilivewithcats.blogspot.co.uk/2015/02/crepusculum-imperii-adapting-lion.html

    Not just restricted to ancients though, the world wide web of wonderful things has all sorts being played using LR rules.
    Looking forward to the next instalment………

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are worse than me! Indian mutiny with muskets and tomahawks, and now fall of Rome with Lion Rampant- Genius😅🎇🎆

      Like

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